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Marketers, here’s how your packaging design choices affect manufacturability

As a marketer looking to drive sales, your packaging designs likely focus on product differentiation, consumer convenience, and consumer expectations. Designing the package can be an artistic experience. However, you need to also be aware of the manufacturability of your design and your engineering team’s goals. After all, engineers are responsible for transforming your concepts…

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Go with the Flow: New Trends in Flow Wrapping

Flow wrapping is a versatile packaging technique that is used for types of products. The technique is favored by production managers for its ease of use, its capacity for high volume with minimal waste, and its cost effectiveness. The flow wrapping process wraps a product in a clear or printed Polyolefin, Polypropylene or laminate film,…

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Key Ingredients for Meal Kits: Leak-free and Flexible Packaging

Meal kits are quickly gaining popularity due to Covid-19 with more consumers staying home to cook; by 2027, the industry is expected to reach 20 billion dollars. There are many opportunities for you to earn contracts from meal kit companies because they change their offerings frequently and require many different types of packaging. The amount and variety of packaging is what affords you…

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The Many Faces of Flexibility: Lessons in Fresh Food Packaging

What did COVID-19 show us?   COVID-19 had a deep and far-reaching impact on the fresh food industry. Social distancing and outbreaks at meat and poultry processing plants slowed production and caused mass shortages. As the pandemic drove restaurant closures, producers scrambled to redirect product originally meant for food service into retail distribution.  In the fresh food industry, retail packaging attributes and quantities are highly dependent on intended distribution channel. As the pandemic stretched on, producers had to shift a significant portion of…

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A primer on hygienically designed packaging machines – Part 1

In its simplest form, hygienic principles apply to two fundamental aspects of design: surfaces designed for contact with food products, and those not meant to be (non-contact). In general, surfaces meant to be in contact with food must be non-porous, smooth and impervious without cracks or crevices. Surface Materials Materials should be non-conducive to contamination,…